Christmas Lessons 2: The Nativity

I sighed as I took the nativity out of the box. A gift from my mother-in-law, the olive wood figurines from Jerusalem stood beautifully in their simplicity. I wanted to do the scene justice–display it in a setting of prominence, center-stage in our family room–yet I wanted to enjoy this nativity for more than one Christmas.

For the same reason the breakable nativity from my mother sets atop the T.V. cabinet, this nativity quietly hangs out on our electric piano: I fear my children.

I fear the two-year-old who ate all the candy out of the kids’ advent calendars by December 10th.

I fear the four-year-old who lost her one new pair of school shoes (how does one lose the shoes that one was wearing?)

I fear the five-year-old who discovered the razor I use on my legs can also shave off hair from his sister’s head.

I don’t want baby Jesus to go missing. I don’t want the shepherd to lose his staff. I don’t want Mary to break her face. And I don’t want the sheep to become part of a wild animal safari in the playroom.

I want them to remain sacred objects of our faith, a reminder of the beautiful Christmas story.

“She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no guest room available for them”

The story of the king sent to reign over heaven and earth, the king who entered this world not on a golden chariot but instead through the blood, sweat, and tears of a young girl. The king for whom there was no room but instead a bed shared amidst foul-smelling animals and dust and hay.

“And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. 9 An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. 10 But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. 11 Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord”

The story of the God who chose to reveal himself first to a group of shepherds, the young and the elderly, those not valued by society but who caused disdain with the stench of sheep they carried. These were the first to meet the Savior of the World.

13 ‘Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying,

14 “Glory to God in the highest heaven,
and on earth peace on whom his favor rests’

The story of a baby who made the angels sing. This baby, the Son of the holy God who loves His children so much that He sent His Son to bring us peace.

As my children retell this story with shining eyes anticipating Christ’s birthday, I see the nativity, no longer mere objects on my piano destined to be broken or misplaced at their hands. These objects that they caress with their fingers, the star that they turn as they sing of that silent night, holy night are living as the story takes root in their hearts.

And that story can’t break.

Linking up with Mama Kat in response to her prompt to describe my nativity scene. Come back tomorrow for another Christmas lesson, this time inspired by some of the Santa stories left by you!

*For the complete Christmas story, read Luke 2.



 


7 thoughts on “Christmas Lessons 2: The Nativity

  1. Just beautiful. The story and the nativity set. I will never tire of hearing it.

    And about losing shoes… It was time to leave for school the other morning and my 8 year old had lost not one, but two pairs of shoes and had to wear an old dirty pair to school! Turns out, they were outside in the yard. Soaking wet!

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    1. I know we've visited each other's blogs before, and I'm always encouraged to know that you understand exactly what I mean! 🙂 The shoes still haven't shown up, though, and I'm completely baffled!

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  2. What a beautiful Nativity. I like how you said the story takes root in their hearts…because the Nativity is made of wood…it is a cool parallel. I think of Psalm 1 and the tree that bears fruit because planted its' roots by living streams of water. I imagine you are doing just that as you share Jesus with your children.

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    1. We certainly are trying, and it's very exciting to see them learning and responding with love for Jesus. Thank you for stopping by, and Merry Christmas!

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  3. Oooh – so lovely, Jennifer! The story, the photos, your family. Yes, you want to protect lovely things from the fingers of excited children, but teaching them that some things need care is a powerful lesson and one that lasts a long time. And you're absolutely right – the story cannot break. Merry Christmas to you!

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